Ogham

 

-An early Irish alphabet, consisted of three sets of ( 1 to 5 ) lines, meeting the corner of a standing stone, in different ways and later in history, a line in a manuscript. It looked like this

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Ogham

 

As you see it had a different order than the normal alphabet. Its order being, B L F S N__H D T C Q__M G (ng) Z R. However if you start the alphabet, with the H D T C Q set, so that its order becomes, H D T C Q B L F S N M G (ng) Z R. Then count out every third letter. Then starting with the second letter count out every third letter and finally, starting with the first letter count every third letter. If you prefer, put a mark at the end of alphabet and counting in the mark, count out every third letter. Simply circle through the alphabet. Your count of three will bring you back to the second and first letters, respectively. As you count them out, place the letters, alternately, on an upper and lower line. This is what you get:
T S R Q M H L
|||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||(ng)
B G D F Z C N
A folded early alphabet. The B G D beginning of the alphabet starting the lower line and the upper line reading backwards, from L to T. The C is in the K position and I take it to be a K.. C and F were roman inventions. In early inscriptions on standing stone the F character was a V. The druids added two more sets of letters, which added the vowels. These did not interfere with using the three original sets in traditonal ways. Obviously the druids learned of developements around the Mediterranean. Possibly, quite some time after their introduction. Assuming (ng) is in its rightful position, thirteen out of fifteen letters are in the right place. This has to be more than a coincidence, especially when it is remembered that other nations modified the alphabet, to suit their purposes. The H and N are the out of place letters. It can now be seen, they saw H D T C Q as the initials of a h-aon, do, tri, ceathear, cuig, a gaelic count of five.They spotted D T C (when the H is moved) in the appropriate positions. An astounding coincidence. Next came Q, a cw sound and they needed two C’s for their count. Not absolutely impossible, cuig was then spelt with a Q. The ordinary alphabet the Irish adopted later, has no Q. I'm guessing CU could denote Q. As I understand it, apart from some surnames, the Q sound has died out of gaelic. Interestingly, cuig’s second and third letter are a U and a vowel. A celtic scholar, up for what is almost certainly a wildgoose chase, could see if five figures in the story, of the genesis of clan Quigley. Anyway, all they had to do was move the H before the M, from where it translates to the beginning of the H D T C Q set. Swapping the opposite letters of a folded alphabet, is considered child’s stuff these days. It may have already become too simple. Maybe (ng) was a way of shuffling mode in the code. Maybe amongst other things ogham’s order, was meant to foil attempts to break it.
In prepaper days they would have wanted an inconspicous, lightweight way of carrying messages. The following shows how unexpected their stratagem might have been. It would have been possible to tie groups of three types of knots, standing in for the ogham cyphers, along twine. Drop in a carrier. I note, that as a rule, one tree of these paired trees, (gaelic letters have tree names) dosn't have it's usual name but often one that means something. Could they have been renamed to retain an existing pairing. Filling in gaps in the alphabet may be part of whats going on here as may including significant trees that share the same initial.

Man of Stone